Oh Good

Posted: May 20, 2009 in Uncategorized
Tags: ,

From Men’s Health:

In other words, thousands of American fighters armed with the latest killing technology are taking prescription drugs that the Federal Aviation Administration considers too dangerous for commercial pilots.

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Comments
  1. Commentor says:

    While not definitely not arguing in favor of anything in the article, the FAA’s rules on pilot medications is extremely detailed and very conservative. For instance, only 2 or 3 allergy medications are allowed, and you can’t take something like Nyquil or Dayquil anytime in the 24 hrs preceding the piloting of a flight. You can’t use Accutane if you are flying at night, and Aspirin is only approved on a case by case basis.

  2. dcrowe says:

    Hi Commentor:

    ….don’t you think the rules for piloting a tank with depleted uranium shells intended to kill people should be *more* stringent than those for piloting a flying machine that’s designed specifically not to kill people?

    I’m just saying.

  3. Commentor says:

    Hey, reread my first sentence! However, if I felt I was qualified to fly a plane, or drive a tank for that matter, I would feel I was just as qualified to fly/drive without my aspirin being approved.

    I think (again while not disagreeing with you) that it boils down to reality. In reality, there are enough people willing to shell out $90k in flight school costs, work for $18k for the first 2 years, and are in good enough health/willing to comply with the FAA’s extremely strict rules for pilot medications. In reality, the Army can’t find enough people that are dumb enough/willing enough to settle for bonuses that will be taken away if they are injured, benefits that are lacking when they return to the states, and the ever present possibility that they are going to die that day AND are healthy/willing to comply with strict rules for medications.

    To take that further, it’d be great if those in tanks could abide by the FAA’s rest policies. Lack of sleep has been proven to impair as badly as drinking alcohol. Yet there’s no way that the Army could enforce 8 hrs of rest during a fire fight.

  4. dcrowe says:

    I know you’re not arguing for the use of drugs by the military. 🙂

    In reality, the Army can’t find enough people that are dumb enough/willing enough to settle for bonuses that will be taken away if they are injured, benefits that are lacking when they return to the states, and the ever present possibility that they are going to die that day AND are healthy/willing to comply with strict rules for medications.

    Probably true. In that case, maybe we should vigorously enforce our recruitment standards, and make decisions about when and where to invade based on our strategic capabilities as they truly exist, rather than lowering standards to allow recruiting in pursuit of a capability we’re unable to get. Maybe that would restrain our propensity for war-making.

    Of course, I don’t believe war or violence are ever appropriate. The idea that you can’t fly a plane, but you could command a tank, however, based on your meds list, is ridiculous, however you slice it. Eight hours of sleep needed, yes. Guys driving around armed with killing machines needed? Nope.

  5. Commentor says:

    Ok, I agree with you in theory. I am all for peace, perfect peace. But in reality (I’m sticking with my common theme) I sure would like someone to go in and forcefully stop the horrors in Sudan.

  6. dcrowe says:

    I agree with you in theory–but disagree with what I perceive as your implication that there are not forceful nonviolent means that could and should be applied in Sudan. 🙂

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